1. Go to https://mapsconnect.apple.com/ and log in with your Apple ID and password. If you don’t already have an Apple ID then you will need to create one at https://mapsconnect.apple.com/getappleid.
  2. Once logged into Apple Maps Connect, click on “View My Businesses”
  3. Click the “+Add” button in the top right and you’ll see the next screen below.
  4. Enter your business name and location then click the search button.
    • If your business isn’t found then you should click on the “Add New Business” link and follow the instructions from there.
    • If your business is found then you should click on the blue “Claim This Business” button and and follow the steps there. This may automatically initiate the verify by phone pop up to display, but you can simply click on “Not Now” come back to that in a few minutes.
  5. Next fill inn all necessary business information, correct the location of your map marker and select up to three appropriate categories.  Be sure your correct hours of operation are displaying and also make sure your company website along with your other social media and other listings are entered.
  6. When you’ve finished with all your entries, Apple Maps will give a chance to review all the details.  Make sure everything is how you want it to be and click “Submit to Apple” to initiate the phone verification process.  You’ll receive a call at the phone number on your Apple Maps listing, so be ready for it.
  7. Once verified, it will take some time for Apple to review and approve any edits.

Apple Maps Connect has a helpful FAQ to help you through this process, so be sure to to look it over if you have any difficulty.

Instagram recently launched “Instagram Business Profiles”, previously there was no separation between business and personal profiles.

Pros:
1. Analytics
Converting your Instagram account to a “Business Profile” will allow you to have access to analytics on your Instagram account. Analytics will show you
Impressions: Total number of times your post was seen
Reach: Number of unique accounts who saw your post
Website Clicks: Number of accounts that have tapped the website link on your Business Profile.
Follower Activity: Average times your followers are on Instagram on a typical day

2. Additional Contact Info
Business Profiles will have the option to add a phone number, an email address and your business’s physical address. When you add contact information, a Contact button will appear near the top of your profile. When people click that button, they’ll see options like Get Directions, Call and Email, depending on the contact information you provided.

Cons: The only downfall is I know they will start limiting businesses ability to get organic views and they’ll force all clicks and views to be paid. That’s exactly what happened over time with Facebook Business Profiles. So for now until they start enforcing that all business have to use the business profile I recommend staying with the regular profile.

Can I try it and switch back? For now it looks like they will let you switch back to a personal Instagram Account if you try it out and change your mind.

https://www.facebook.com/business/help/1717693135113805

There are four categories for the amount of text allowed on a Facebook ad. Your image text can be considered “OK”, “Low”, “Medium”, or “High.” The amount of text on your ad will determine the reach that it could potentially have. For example, an image that has the following text would be considered “Medium,” which may cause your ad to reach fewer people.

Facebook Text Ad Images Guide

As you can see in the image above, Facebook is recommending that you “try” to use as little text in your ad images as possible. They recommend focusing your text in copy rather than in the image. And they even suggest limiting font size.

Here’s an important tidbit:

Facebook ads that contain images with little to no text tend to cost less and have better delivery than ads with image text.

From the start, Facebook is telling you that you can use text, but as you increase the amount of text that you use you can expect the reach to drop and costs to increase.

To provide further context, Facebook breaks down text density into four categories:

  • OK
  • Low
  • Medium
  • High

Facebook also provides examples of each and what to expect regarding distribution.

Image Text: OK

Facebook prefers little or no text in an image…

Facebook Text Images Guide OK

And here are three examples…

Facebook Text Ad Images Guide Preferred

Facebook wants us to keep copy within the text box and off of ad images.

Image Text: LOW

But you may want to include some text. Here’s an example with a “low” amount of text in it, similar to what we may see in current ads…

Facebook Text Images Guide Low

Of course, if you also include the logo (which Facebook says they include), that would be more than 20%.

Here are three more examples of “low” text…

Facebook Text Ad Images Guide Low

In each case, Facebook says you can expect reach of your ads to be at least slightly limited.

Image Text: MEDIUM

Add even more text (in this case, some next to the logo), and it will be classified as “medium.”

Facebook Text Images Guide Medium

Here are some examples…

Facebook Text Ad Images Guide Medium

While Facebook labels it as “medium,” the examples they give have “heavy” text and they say that reach will be “severely limited.”

Image Text: HIGH

Then there’s a matter of really pushing the limits and using “too much” text…

Facebook Text Images Guide High

Even in this case, Facebook won’t reject your ad. You just may not get it shown.

Here are some examples…

Facebook Text Ad Images Guide High

Yeah, so don’t do this. You’ll get it approved, but it won’t reach anyone.

Some Exceptions

Facebook also notes that these guidelines don’t apply to the following:

  • Movie posters
  • Book covers
  • Album covers
  • Product images: Where an entire product can be seen, and not just a zoomed in image of the product
  • Posters for concerts/music festivals, comedy shows or sporting events
  • Text-based businesses: Calligraphy, cartoon/comic strips, etc.
  • App and game screenshots
  • Legal text
  • Infographics

Most of this isn’t new. For the rest of us, there has always been a product exception.

However, I find a couple of these particularly interesting. The infographic exception, in particular. I’ve wanted to promote infographics in the past, but didn’t due to the rule.

Legal text and text-based businesses also get the exception, which I believe is new.

What This Really Means: Not Much

I’ve seen way too much excitement over this change — or test, depending on how you look at it. While the 20% text rule may be going away for some — and potentially for all if it moves beyond a test — it impacts our approach to text very little.

As Facebook said, users don’t react well to ads with a high text concentration in images. And while they won’t be rejected, your distribution will suffer and the costs could be high.

Is it really worth it?

You’ll need to determine if lower reach and higher costs are worth the additional text. For me, I plan to approach text in the way I always have — less is better. Be a minimalist.

Even if there is no “rule,” act as if there is one.